Region 2

Nueva Vizcaya villagers oppose mining project, referendum says

Source: 
.ARTHUR L. ALLAD-IW, www.nordis.net - http://www.nordis.net/?p=10089
Date of publication: 
29 July, 2011

BAYOMBONG, Nueva Vizcaya, July 29 (PIA) — A recent referendum on the proposed mining project in the towns of Aritao, Dupax del Sur, Bambang and Kayapa showed the affected villager’s firm opposition.

Gregorio Singgangan, National Commission on Indigenous People (NCIP) provincial officer said the recent mining referendum was conducted in line with the Free Prior and Informed Consent (FPIC) provision of the Indigenous People’s Rights Act or IPRA law which requires the FPIC before a mining project will be undertaken.

The referendum was conducted to get the consent of the affected villag

N. Vizcaya determined vs three mining giants

Source: 
MARY LOU MARIGZA, Northern Dispatch - http://bulatlat.com/main/2011/07/25/n-vizcaya-determined-vs-three-mining-giants/
Date of publication: 
25 July, 2011

BAYOMBONG, Nueva Vizcaya – The people of Nueva Vizcaya, particularly the people of Kasibu and Quezon, are determined to oppose three mining giants exploring for gold and other minerals in their areas.

This was the finding of the International Study Tour to Mining Communities of Nueva Vizcaya (ISTNV) last July 10-11. The ISTNV visited the areas of Oceana Gold Philippines, Inc.

Int’l group probes alleged land-grab by foreign firms

Source: 
Cynthia D. Balana,Philippine Daily Inquirer - http://newsinfo.inquirer.net/12098/int%E2%80%99l-group-probes-alleged-land-grab-by-foreign-firms
Date of publication: 
5 June, 2011

An international fact-finding team is in the country to investigate the alleged land-grabbing by Philippine, Japanese and Taiwanese companies of some 11,000 hectares from indigenous peoples in Isabela to build the biggest bio-ethanol project in the Philippines.

The international mission is composed of delegates from the Organic Consumers Association (USA), Global Forest Coalition (Paraguay), Action Center for Development and Rights (Japan), Friends of Earth (Japan), Philippine Solidarity Network (Canada); and from the Philippines, the Asian Peasant Coalition, Southeast Asia Regional Initiat

Support Small Scale Farmers and Indigenous Peoples in Defense of their Land

To All Who Defend the Rights to Food and Health, Peasant Farmers’ Rights, Women’s Rights, Indigenous Peoples’ Rights, All who believe in Environmental, Climate, Social and Economic Justice, and All who seek an End to Militarization of Rural Communities:

Peasant farmers and Indigenous Peoples are calling for international attention to the urgent situation of land grabbing, militarization and the pending destruction of local small farm lands to make way for the establishment of 11, 000 hectares of monocrop sugar cane plantations and processing facilities for a biofuel project in the municipal

Nueva Vizcaya Gov asks PNoy not to allow mining

Source: 
Ben Moses Ebreo, PIA Press Release - http://www.pia.gov.ph/?m=1&t=1&id=21542
Date of publication: 
10 March, 2011

BAYOMBONG, Nueva Vizcaya , March 10 (PIA)– Citing the lack of climate change mitigation and adaptation requirements, health risks, disaster mitigation and possible escalation of cases and incidents of human rights abuses, governor Luisa Cuaresma here asked President Benigno Simeon Aquino III not to allow mining projects in the province.

“Although we admit that indeed our province is rich in mineral resources, our wealth lies not in what is underground but in our peace-loving people of different cultures who want nothing more in this world than to live in harmony with nature,” she said

IPs call for end of mining on ancestral lands

Source: 
http://www.cbcpnews.com/?q=node%2F14836
Date of publication: 
2 March, 2011

BAYOMBONG—Tribal folks in Nueva Vizcaya called for an end of mining activities on their ancestral lands, saying large-scale mining will destroy their forests and leave them with nothing.

“Respect the indigenous people’s rights. And our call: NO TO LARGE-SCALE MINING.

Governor opposes British mining project in N. Vizcaya

Source: 
http://www.tribuneonline.org/nation/20110306nat7.html
Date of publication: 
6 March, 2011

BAYOMBONG, Nueva Vizcaya — In a surprise move, the province’s governor sought the cancellation of a British-funded mining company’s Financial and Technical Assistance Agreement (FTAA) issued by the previous administration in 2009.

This came just as the provincial board here endorsed the multibillion-peso FCF Minerals project during their regular session last Feb. 28.

In a letter to President Aquino dated March 2, Gov.

House committee to probe mining royalties

Source: 
FLORO TAGUINOD, GMANews.TV - http://www.gmanews.tv/story/212023/house-committee-to-probe-mining-royalties
Date of publication: 
1 February, 2011

LAGAWE, Ifugao — The House of Representatives committee on National Cultural Communities (NCC) is set to investigate some officers of the National Commission on Indigenous Peoples (NCIP) over their alleged involvement in a fund reparations anomaly.

The NCIP could be involved in irregularities concerning over P 71 million in royalties due to the Mamanwa tribe in Surigao Del Norte, said Ifugao Rep.

Philippine rights body wants OceanaGold deal revoked

Source: 
http://af.reuters.com/article/metalsNews/idAFSGE70G05720110117?sp=true
Date of publication: 
17 January, 2011

MANILA (Reuters) – The Philippines’ human rights commission said the government should consider withdrawing OceanaGold Ltd’s rights to a mining project because the Australian miner had violated rights of indigenous people.

Leo Jasareno, acting director of the Mines and Geosciences Bureau (MGB), told Reuters he had not yet seen the recommendations, but the bureau would have to look into them.

“If there is such a recommendation by the Commission on Human Rights, then the MGB is duty-bound to open an investigation and find out if there is ground,” he said in a text message.

The Didipio m

The plight of the Aetas

Source: 
Rey Salita, Manila Standard

Aetas begging on the streets during the holidays are met with amusement and some degree of curiosity.

We frown on them when they use makeshift musical instruments in an attempt to provide their potential benefactors some entertainment.

Only a few of us urban dwellers appreciate the fact that the problems facing these indigenous peoples go deeper than cultural discrimination.